Tag Archives: Leonard J. Mountain Chief

It will never change until we change it!

By Jay North OneGlobePress.com

And the band plays on! While its politics as usual 2016 and all US citizens know nothing will change because the belly of the beast on Wall Street controls the whole damn machine. While many people have their eyes on the economy; 25 of the world’s worst man-made ecological disasters occurred in 2015 and little attention was ever given as to how or why. This is sad news for the whole planet and for the people that live on it.


While so many American’s put their faith in big business, politics and the economy it just might behoove one to put equal attention on nature and our environment. As my adopted father Leonard J. Mountain Chief would often repeat “a change has got to come, sooner better than later.”

I urge all concerned people to read my book about my mentor/father in my book, Open Spaces: My Life With Leonard J. Mountain Chief, as seen at OneGlobePress.com in hard copy’s and FREE in PDF with your request to jaysbookshere@gmail.com.

“Without this place the children have no place to run and play, please tell a friend,” Leonard J. Mountain Chief. It will never change until we change it!

Thank you
Jay North

Find Your Path, Find Your Passion


The Native way will certainly help you find your path. I would love to share this with you. Order my book in PDF or hard copy; Open Spaces; My Life With Leonard J Mountain Chief, Blackfeet Elder From Northwest Montana. Filled with important messages for all time and all age! Read our journey together and become enlightened by it.

Leonard (my adopted father)ask me to share these stories long ago, I promised him I would!

The book can be ordered though OneGlobePress.com

Come into Sacred Ceremony

With Jay and Leonard J. Mountain Chief

Leonard said, “One day all people everywhere will come to know who they are. They will realize their own strength and power and be able to give loving service through their newfound knowledge and personal power.”

He said that people already know this and that they either mask this inner wisdom or have somehow managed to forget who they truly are. “People act in funny ways when they are not being their true selves,” he said and laughed out loud.

Leonard said that we are all leaders, writers, and artists; we are all mothers and fathers, teachers and healers. To Leonard there was nothing more important than people knowing who they are and what their true calling, or purpose for life, is.

“Come into scared ceremony,” Leonard called. “Retrieve your soul, and never be shrouded in mystery again. Carry with you a hand drum, a shaker, sage, and a gift offering.

“Deep in those mountains, there is a valley. It has been sacred to our people for thousands of years and holds great medicine power unknown to most. Some of your people may not even recognize the power as they sit on this land,” he said.

“Walk in, come to sacred ceremony in reverence and silence as you approach this valley. Ask the ancestors’ permission to be there. Give praise and thanksgiving to the Creator for providing such a wondrous place. Take with you a valued possession and offer it as a sacred gift. Build an altar and chant a prayer. It does not matter in what language,” Leonard said. “The Creator hears all languages.

“As you near the center of the valley, find your spot or the place you feel most comfortable, lay a blanket, and sit. Quiet your mind. Do not speak until it is time. Call in the ancestors and the great ones to be at your side and welcome their presence. Sit quietly for as long as you can. Light the sage, and with its smoke, bless this place, the surroundings, yourself, and whoever entered with you.

“Drum the drum song, chant and sing, and allow the Great Spirit to take over sacred ceremony. Allow Him to do the talking through you as you ask, ‘Who am I?’  It does not matter if you are unsure of the words that come, let them come. Dance, sing, and chant. If you have located running water and it is nearby, use your hands to scoop up the water to wash your face and head. Ask for purification. Continue to wash until you are cleansed. Continue. Allow the words to come. Be not concerned about whose words they are; be not concerned about your brain or any other apparent distraction, and simply ask.

“Now, ask again, ‘Who am I?  Who am I?  What is my reason for being here?’  Allow the great one to speak and you listen,” Leonard advised.

“Some may need to go into the sweat lodge to help find these answers. Others may need to fast for several days. Some may need to climb the sacred mountain and stay on top for a week or more. Others will find it necessary to live the teepee life alone for an entire year to discover who they are and why they are here. No one is exempt from knowing these answers,” said Leonard. “Money will not buy the desired result, drugs will only mask the way, and many therapists are of no value. Only the Great One can help reveal this and He does so through sacred ceremony.

“The only way for one to know is to ask, look, and be silent.

“Sacred ceremony is for anyone who chooses to know. It is not for the coward, for once one knows who they are and their reason for being, they will find they must take action in their lives and this may require drastic changes. This is not an easy way and the lazy will not attempt this path at all,” he said.

“Come into sacred ceremony,” Leonard called, “all the answers will be revealed there.”

“This is not a once in a lifetime action. All mysteries are not revealed all at one time. No,” Leonard said, “it is continuous. It is a process for your full development as a human being here in this place and the unfoldment of your soul. It takes patience and persistence. Remember this,” he continued, “just when you think you have gone as far as you can and you’re just too tired to go on and feel like giving up, that is when the mysteries will reveal themselves to you. There are many mysteries that will unfold during ceremony, and that is what makes this a process a lifelong journey.”

Leonard said, “Once I had a young man come to me crying, ‘I am going insane, Leonard, what do I do?’  I replied, ‘Dive deep into the pool of insanity. That is the only way for you to transcend it. That is your ceremony. There is no other way.’

“To walk the Red Path takes courage and determination. Never take the weak or half-hearted into sacred ceremony; you will only waste your energy,” said Leonard.

“When one comes out of ceremony with newfound knowledge, they often cry in gratitude and want to offer a gift to the leader of ceremony. If you lead, never turn down the gift; you would only take away their appreciation and accomplishments,” said Leonard. “For now they know who they are and know they know their path. Now they can fully love themselves and their neighbors. No one has told them this. No unwanted advice was given; no special training was required. Their own knowing and willingness to do ceremony has given them the knowledge that so many crave and no one can ever take that away.

“Never go into sacred ceremony lightheartedly,” he insisted, “You can only enter with reverence, in silence, and with appreciation in your heart and love for the Great One.”

Leonard could not stress enough the respect we must demonstrate for sacred ceremony and the appreciation we must show. To always praise the Creator and give thanks in deep appreciation is of paramount importance to The People of the Blackfeet Nation.

In a casual world, we no longer approach things with the reverence they deserve. Are we afraid of being serious? “Perhaps,” said Leonard. Maybe we would be well served to ponder the seriousness of our lives, to focus on our health, our path and the welfare of others. Laughter, it is said, is the best medicine, and no one enjoyed a good laugh more than Leonard. But he was not afraid to give any situation the reverence it called for. “It is basic human respect,” he said, “there is no other way.”

Leonard said, “They may take our land, they may destroy my body, but they can never take away my real life and knowing who I am.”

Leonard was a great man, huge in spirit, quiet in demeanor and a pure joy to be with. And still is very much today.

From Jays book, Open Spaces; My life With Leonard J. Mountain Chief


Working To Change Conditions On Planet Earth For The Better

Open Spaces: My Life with Leonard J. Mountain Chief by your truly

In my book Open Spaces, I offer a personal and uncensored account of my time with Leonard J. Mountain Chief of the Blackfoot tribe of Native Americans. This experience was profoundly significant, and altered my perspective on many things regarding life, culture, mysticism, and ancient religion.

My Life-Changing Experience

Without giving too much away, my book details the transformative experience I had amongst the Blackfeet tribe in northwest Montana—far from the southern California landscape I referred to as home.

The beautiful landscape was as inspiring as the words spoken to me by the Blackfeet elder, whose wisdom was sincere and untainted by modernity.

In today’s fast-paced culture, it can be easy to forget that this beautiful nation was once populated by Native Americans deeply entrenched in their own fascinating religious and cultural traditions. I discovered one profound truth at the heart of the Blackfeet society—in order to be truly happy, we must return to our roots in nature and simplify our lives.

Mysticism in Northwest Montana

I spent time with Leonard J. Mountain Chief around the new millennium, when even the skeptics among us were fearful about the impacts the year 2012 would have on our lives. Many of us can recall the electric, fearful energy in the air around that time, as we wondered whether or not the world would might end at midnight on January 1, 2012.

This is not, as some might believe, simply a Eurocentric phenomenon. The year 2012 was equally important to other cultures. The Blackfoot elder taught me the significance of the new millennium in Native theology, and cast the curtain aside, allowing me to participate in their religious rituals and mystical traditions, in spite of their deep privacy and distrust of outsiders.

Share in the Experience

Although I first wrote about my experiences several years ago, this story remains deeply important to many people, and I highly recommend reading it if you are dealing with insecurities and fears about the state of modern society. The truths I learned from my “adopted father,” Leonard J. Mountain Chief, have resounded with readers throughout the years and brought comfort to many spiritual seekers.

I have recently released a newly revised edition of Open Spaces for you to enjoy. The hard copy is available on Amazon, and I would love to hear your feedback. How did the book affect you? What did you take away from it? In these uncertain times, it would bring me joy to know that my words and experiences are bringing peace to my readers.

Please share these stories with family and friends,

Jay North aka J. Mountain Chief

Open Spaces: My Life with Leonard J. Mountain Chief can be purchased at www.OneGlobePress.com

What does Bernie Sanders stand for?

In a tweet posted on October 29, Bernie Sanders stated, “With so much violence in this world today, I just don’t think the state itself should be in the business of killing people.”

In today’s America, gun-crazed and alert to any possible threat, such a statement borders on radical. But it very clearly encapsulates Sanders’ personal ideology, which he has consistently brought forth through his position as a Vermont Senator.

While many politicians on the left have been accused of simply pandering to the various marginalized groups receiving attention at the moment, if not entirely shifting their political stance on certain issues in order to gain more votes from specific demographics, Sanders seems to be the rare exception whose heart is genuinely in the right place.

It is easy to become cynical of politicians’ motivations, in a country where major corporations paint their products in rainbow colors in order to draw support from the LGBT community, but low-income gay teenagers in small, religiously conservative towns in the deep south still face homelessness and parental abandonment, and transgender women’s brutal, violent murders go unreported in the mainstream media.

It is easy to see why impoverished, suffering Americans might be suspicious of a politician who appears on the scene suddenly with aspirations of borrowing the Nordic model of social democracy, advocating for racial and gender inequality, and overturning invasive surveillance laws, when the current state of America is so far removed from this seemingly idyllic utopia.

It’s understandable why Sanders has his fair share of doubters. But, for all intents and purposes, he appears to be sincere in his efforts. During his time at the University of Chicago, he was active in the civil rights movement and joined the Young People’s Socialist League. In the 1970s, he was an active member of the anti-war Liberty Union Party.

Sanders’ fans and critics alike find it difficult to find much inconsistency in his beliefs, suggesting that he is genuinely concerned about the wellbeing of oppressed Americans and not simply coddling them during the campaign in hopes of being elected.

Though Sanders does not appear to actively practice his Jewish faith at this point in time, he seems to have a better grasp on the concept of loving your enemy than many of his most devoutly “religious” opponents. Sanders made the curious decision to speak at the strongly right-wing Liberty University this past September, reaching out to students steeped in the conservative Christian culture that fears his platform the most.

What Sanders hopes to bring to the country is nothing short of revolutionary. That America is even willing to listen to his ideas in 2015 is indicative of how desperate oppressed minorities are to have their voices heard, to receive equal opportunities, to feel as though the leaders of their country care whether they are able to afford basic necessities.

What Sanders has been talking about I have been writing about since 1971. And, this from my mentor and adopted father Leonard J. Mountain Chief, “A change has got to come, sooner better than later.”

Peace for now, Jay North